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A safer future together

ROADMAP TO SAFETY

Beginning in 2016, the purpose of our community safety meetings is to develop grassroots community leaders who support a preventive approach to community safety.

Over the years the meeting has grown to be an inclusive and welcoming mechanism for connection, engagement, sharing, learning and empowerment

Meetings convene residents, businesses, business associations, service agencies, community groups, EPS, REACH, City of Edmonton and invited resources

SAFETY MEETING OUTCOMES

  • New and engaged neighbourhood leaders
  • More inclusive and welcoming communities
  • Community-driven innovation
  • Greater neighbourhood connectivity
  • Enhanced public perception of safety

CPTED

(Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design)

Moving towards crime prevention strategies, our meeting have begun to explore the use of CPTED practices. Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design (CPTED) is based on the idea that the design and use of the built and surrounding physical environment can improve the quality of life by deterring crime and reducing the fear of crime. The following are 4 common CPTED principles:

ACCESS CONTROL

  • Selectively placing entrances and exits, fencing, lighting and landscape to limit access or control flow

ACTIVITY SUPPORT

  • Using the space the way it was designed and intended to. Soccer fields are used to play soccer, school yards are used by school children

TERRITORIALITY

  • How you design a space to signify it is a private space

SURVEILLANCE

  • Occurs by designing the placement of physical features, activities and people to maximize visibility

ONE HALF OF THE EQUATION

Traditional CPTED practices only address the physical environment which is only half of the equation. To move towards a holistic approach to community crime prevention, the design of the social environment needs to be considered as well.

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MOVING TOWARDS SECON GEN. CPTED

Jane Jacobs is famous for coining the idea of eyes on the street but this goes beyond just sightlines and visibility. What’s important is the eye’s themselves.

When she says eye’s on the streets she also means looking into the eyes of our neighbours.

Second-Generation CPTED focuses on the specific social and cultural dynamics existing in each individual neighbourhood.

The four main pillars are:

SOCIAL COHESION

  • Seeking to establish and affirm relationships that exist between residents. How we go about developing that social glue. This also takes into account our values as a community, our agreed upon behaviours and ideals as to what a good neighbour is.

 

CONNECTIVITY

  • The ability to establish positive relationships with organizations and groups external to itself. Relationships social agencies, the city, the police, churches, businesses, bars, pharmacies.

COMMUNITY CULTURE

  • How we practice and celebrate the values that bring us together. Extent of social and cultural diversity within a neighbourhood. Prevalence of special places, festivals, and events. Extent of community traditions and cultural activities.

 

THRESHOLD CAPACITY

  • Understanding what the community is capable of. Understanding the strengths and weaknesses. Understanding what the social and physical assets are in the community.

Working together, the two principles will help us work towards a neighbourhood that not only looks safe (physical environment) but also feels safe (social environment).

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Contact us

Have a question about our meetings? Please feel free to reach out and contact us!

Mark Davis
Community Convener

mark.davis@reachedmonton.ca

Jaime Calayo
Communications

jaime.calayo@reachedmonton.ca

Kelly Holland
Community Engagement

kelly.holland@reachedmonton.ca

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